#3 “It should not be a burden to be born female”

Women are treated differently then men everyday. Maybe not in a terrible way, and maybe not on purpose, but that’s still not equality. Many people believe that we live in a fair and modern world, or that what we are doing now is the best we ever can be, but that’s not true. That’s never true. We can do better.

Women are different from men, we are not the same, but we are just as good, deserve  to have just as much respect, and need to be treated as equals, because we are. This is a major problem in our society. Not only do some people think men are better, for some people it’s just so common for them it’s ingrained in their thinking. This is even worse, for there is almost nothing you can say to convince them what they know is wrong.

I feel as though this problem is frequently overlooked, because it appears not all at once, but in tiny splotches, just a word or two that makes a woman or girl feel worse about themselves. However, this is not a problem no one knows about. Many, many people have a lot to say about the matter. I asked my sister for some of her thoughts and she responded with a paragraph of text, and would have gone longer had I  not asked for a short statement. One of her thoughts caught me in particular. She said “It should not be a burden to be born a female.” This is true. Very, very true. But it got me thinking. Yes, it should not be a burden to be born female, but this is not the whole truth. It is missing a crucial piece. And that piece is the fact that it should not be a burden to be born male, either. When I went into this program and started thinking about doing women’s rights I was thinking of trying to stop sexism by trying to help women who where discriminated against. And now I realize that I should also be trying to help women see that it is not fixing this problem when we discriminate against men. Because that still wouldn’t be equal.

I talked to my brother Ben Balparda, my close friend Camille  Maglianti, and my sister Carolyn Balparda. All of them agreed that women need the same rights as men. One quote from Camille pretty much summed up all of their statements. “It doesn’t matter what gender you are, we are all humans, so therefore should all have equal rights.” All in all, my interviews where very similar. I thought it would be interesting to talk to my brother about women’s rights, and get the other side of the story. Of course it depends very drastically on who you’re talking to, but a good number of men feel the same way I do. Because of this, I feel that it is very important to remember: men are not the enemy. And this is where the problem of overly feminist women come in. So, please, remember that fact.

 

Balparda, Carolyn Elisabeth. “Talking to Carolyn.” Telephone interview. 25 Sept. 2016.

Balparda, Ben Edward. “Talking to Ben.” Personal interview. 25 Sept. 2016.

Maglianti, Camille. “Talking to Camille.” Personal interview. 25 Aug. 2016.

 

Megan Balparda

6 Responses to “#3 “It should not be a burden to be born female”

  • Hi Megan!

    My name is Lena, I’m an eight grader at Shelburne Community School, and I can’t wait to read your blog!

    I think that you address a serious issue, and I can’t wait to see what else you discover. What do you think will be the most effective way to start changing the Women’s Rights issues in Vermont?

    I’m excited to begin working with you!

  • Hi Lena!
    I’m not sure exactly how to start changing the women’s rights issues, I just entered seventh grade at MUMS, and am very new to this kind of thing. I’m very open to any suggestions, if you happen to have any. I need all the help I can get! I also can’t wait to start working with you and reading more of your blog!

  • Megan,
    I love this sentence: “I feel as though this problem is frequently overlooked, because it appears not all at once, but in tiny splotches, just a word or two that makes a woman or girl feel worse about themselves.”

    For me, this sums up my experiences with gender discrimination. I’ve never felt it outright, like a huge slap in the face; it’s always more of a subtle, dull reality check.

    I also like your idea of getting Ben’s perspective on the topic, and I am intrigued to see where you go from here.

    And I just have to say: I’m so glad you’re a part of this team and that you’ve taken the initiative to dive into this (or maybe a different) meaningful and important topic. Congrats!

    Sincerely,
    CK

  • Hi Mrs. Krahn!
    Thank you so much for that comment! It feels really great to have all this support. I’m so happy you encouraged me to join WTS!

  • Bob Uhl
    4 years ago

    Hi Megan,

    Nice work here, and I especially like your title. You’ve got the ball rolling on conversations about this important issue. I don’t know how old Carolyn and Camille are, but if they have jobs, I wonder if they have experienced sexism at work–or if that’s even an area of this topic that you’re interested in covering. The scope of this issue is huge, as it affects women in all areas of life. As you think more about your topic, it may be helpful to consider whether you want to narrow it to focus on a particular aspect. But there’s time for that. You’re off to a good start!

  • Hi Megan, Im glad that you picked this topic. It is definitely an important one. I noticed that you said some really great things. What you said in response to people having sexism ingrained in their thinking “This is even worse, for there is almost nothing you can say to convince them what they know is wrong.” I feel like that statement really grasped the real problem. The unnoticed sexism that accompanies everyday life. It will be interesting to see what else you do with this topic going forward.

Leave a Reply Text

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

css.php
Skip to toolbar