#4 Seems pretty clear cut and simple to me…

Olympia Kulp

9 Responses to “#4 Seems pretty clear cut and simple to me…

  • Lou Bernieri
    4 years ago

    Olympia, your map is an excellent way of visually presenting your argument. It all makes sense given all the research and data we have on marijuana use and it clarifies the issues. I think the personal anecdotes — “I have friends who …” — are important to convincing your audience.

    You might consider taking the opposition’s best few arguments against legalization and addressing them. That way you answer their strongest objections and preempt their argument.

    I know Colorado, where it’s been legalized, has strong data on the results of legalization. You could use their stiff to back up your argument. The US Army and World Health Organization did extensive studies on marijuana use in Panama 25-30 or so years ago and concluded there were no significant health effects on light or heavy users.

    • Hey Lou,

      Thank you for responding to my post. I love your idea about the preemptive addressing of the oppositions arguments. Thank you so much for the suggestions on where to find data I have been looking for more studies because there are less than I would have assumed. While I have plenty of facts you can never have enough data to back up what you are saying.

      Sincerely,
      Olympia

  • Hi Olympia,
    I like how clearly you lay out your priorities for this issue going forward. Obviously I also think this is an issue that merits investigation, especially as how it ties into education, law enforcement, and race relations in this country and this state. You mention that part of your idea of change is getting people to accept that there will never be an effective roadside test, I’m curious what you mean by that. We certainly don’t have any means of testing currently, which I believe speaks to our larger issues regarding marijuana research. If we don’t have roadside tests, what do you think we should be doing to regulate marijuana use and driving? I think it’s interesting that you bring up the economic side, I think that’s an important factor in this issue that not a lot of people are addressing. Looking forward to seeing where this takes you next!

    Lucy

    • Hey Lucy,

      Thank you for responding to my post. I think that while there is no way to regulate if someone is driving under the influence of cannabis it is also less of a problem than you would imagine. Not only does cannabis not physically impair the user like alcohol, but a study conducted showed that driving under the influence of cannabis is only as dangerous as driving while talking on the phone, or eating. Texting and driving is more dangerous. While it is not ideal to be unable to gauge high drivers it’s also not even a concern of mine. Also yes! I would love to perhaps join forces in a double team of marijuana education and legalization or something, I don’t know.

  • Hi Olympia,
    I like how clearly you lay out your priorities for this issue going forward. Obviously I also think this is an issue that merits investigation, especially as how it ties into education, law enforcement, and race relations in this country and this state. You mention that part of your idea of change is getting people to accept that there will never be an effective roadside test, I’m curious what you mean by that. We certainly don’t have any means of testing currently, which I believe speaks to our larger issues regarding marijuana research. If we don’t have roadside tests, what do you think we should be doing to regulate marijuana use and driving? I think it’s interesting that you bring up the economic side, I think that’s an important factor in this issue that not a lot of people are addressing.

    Lucy

  • Olympia,
    I love watching your thinking expand as you explore this topic more. It seems like you are growing more and more passionate about this issue which – I will repeat again and again – will make or break this project for you! Keep following your passion. This is an incredibly relevant topic right now that has an immense amount of historical significance. Everyone is thinking about this issue, as it’s something that touches everyone. From minority groups, specifically people of color as well as disabled people or people with chronic pain syndromes, to doctors, politicians, law enforcement and everyone in between . I am thrilled to watch you expand your thinking even more!
    Eva

    • Hi Eva!

      Hey thanks for reading my posts. I am passionate about this because of all the people that it affects, especially people of color, or all white people with dreads. Thank you for the words of encouragement, I look forward to continuing with this topic!

      Sincerely,
      Olympia

  • I think the fact that this can be such a racial issue is so important. I am wondering if that is what you want to go forward with in this topic? Explaining the history is so helpful, and relating that back to the present is I think what really can convince people. It sounds like you have a lot of hard facts to tell people, but how do you think you can convince them with their feelings? Often times people try to make a change with hard facts, but often people don’t feel the drive to make a change. Think about how you can get people to feel that this is a very important topic. Think about how you can make them feel the need for this change.

    • Hey Riley,

      unfortunately these posts are over the internet because I am told that I am a “Waaaayyyyy to intense and passionate speaker” so usually I just go with hard facts when trying to argue a point. I most certainly am going to continue with this topic as a racial issue because it unfortunately is a racial issue and has been used to essentially suppress people of color through mass incarceration. I wish that wasn’t the case but it is so I will continue on as a racial issue.

      Sincerely,
      Olympia

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