#8: I LOVE MOVIES, AND I LIKE MAKING THEM

 

 

Self Direction

I’ve craved self direction for my entire life. It’s one of the reasons why I’ve always had a hard time with traditional education. It was great to have that freedom in this experience, but sometimes it hindered more than helped our team. I utilized feedback from others well, and I was diligent about completing blog posts, and then later, team tasks. The hardest part in this piece was making sure things were organized, which is an area I’ve consistently lacked in.

Responsible and Involved Citizenship

Everyone on the team generally had similar views when approaching this topic, so the hard part was remaining neutral when interacting with others who might not have the same viewpoints. Conducting interviews was an informative experience for me, coming from someone who is very passionate trying to learn how to appear neutral or even, learning how not to engage. A lot of times in interviews, I wanted to engage in discussion because it felt natural, but due to it being an interview I had to remain quiet. I tried to remain focused on a story arc as I was conducting interviews. Including seemingly more inconsequential things like setting up/framing a shot, that actually have a big impact.

Informed and Integrative Thinking

Synthesizing information was an important part of the documentary process. We conducted a lot of interviews that we had to cut for times sake, and I wish we’d been more intentional about our story arc from the beginning, because it would’ve saved a lot of time. I think our evidence was abundant, because we gathered as many perspectives as we could. It was helpful to keep asking questions like “Who is important to the story/who are the stakeholders?” “What are we trying to say?” and “What do we want the audience to leave with?” These guiding questions were important to come back to throughout the process.

Clear and Effective Communication

My team and I definitely got along, but we had to make sure we were being productive in our conversations and not steering off track. There were times where our disorganization got us in some tough spots. Sometimes my editing would get re done by other team members, things I worked really hard on. I had to learn how to navigate this, learn when to take the lead, and when to let someone else step up.

Unexpected Learning

I didn’t expect how much I would have to ignore my own instincts for the sake of the team. It was important to appear unbiased in interviews even when I wanted to engage, and to learn when to take the lead when I wanted to remain in the backseat. On the flipside, learn when to speak up about my perspectives and opinions and demand that my voice be heard. Sometimes keeping only the team’s interests in mind was exhausting and I had to focus on what I wanted. This experience was about finding a balance. Choosing when to hold the megaphone and when to hold it out for someone else.

 

In conclusion, I love movies. But I like making them, too.

 

Thanks for reading,

Lindsey

Lindsey Drew

One Response to “#8: I LOVE MOVIES, AND I LIKE MAKING THEM

  • Dixie Goswami
    3 years ago

    “Unexpected Learning

    I didn’t expect how much I would have to ignore my own instincts for the sake of the team. It was important to appear unbiased in interviews even when I wanted to engage, and to learn when to take the lead when I wanted to remain in the backseat. On the flipside, learn when to speak up about my perspectives and opinions and demand that my voice be heard. Sometimes keeping only the team’s interests in mind was exhausting and I had to focus on what I wanted. This experience was about finding a balance. Choosing when to hold the megaphone and when to hold it out for someone else.”

    Dear Lindsay,
    Here’s my unexpected learning from reading your post, with many thanks. This Sunday morning I’ll be checking out some of talk shows that are, mostly, interviews and clips: Chuck Todd, Fareed Zacharia,
    Andrea Mitchell, Rev. Sharpton. I will use your approach to see who is striking a balance and who is not; when the interviewer chooses when to hold the megaphone or mic out for someone else. Many many thanks. Dixie

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